Jack the Ripper the First Media Murderer

Posted in Jack The Ripper by Thomas Walker

In the early hours of Friday, 31st August 1888, a carter coming to work found the body of a woman lying by a stable door in Whitechapel. Her throat had been cut and her body mutilated with a knife. Her name was Mary Ann Nichols, and she was only the first victim of the murderer who would come to be known as Jack the Ripper, London -- and the world's -- most famous serial killer. Read more...

Queen Elizabeth II: The Early Years

Posted in The Royal Family 1930s 1940s by Thomas Walker

Queen Elizabeth was born at 2:40am on 21st April 1926 at her maternal grandfather’s house at 17 Bruton Street in Mayfair. She was the first child of the Duke of York, Prince Albert, who’d later become King George VI, and his wife Elizabeth. The new princess was named after her mother, as well as taking the names of her grandfather’s mother, Alexandra, and her paternal grandmother Mary. Read more...

The Final Days of The Third Reich and The Death of Adolf Hitler

Posted in World War II The Death of Adolf Hitler by Thomas Walker

On the 12th April 1945, President Franklin Roosevelt died at his home in Warm Springs, Georgia. Upon hearing the news, the German hierarchy celebrated, with Joseph Goebbels commenting, “This is the turning point.” The following day, Hitler himself was said to have reassured his nation’s battered troops on the Eastern Front that relief was imminent. Berlin, he assured them, would remain German. And Vienna – which the Russians had seized only that day – would soon be part of the Fatherland again... Read more...

D-Day: First Hand Accounts

Posted in World War II Operation Overlord Accounts by Thomas Walker

The Operation Overlord attack involved over 5,000 craft and succeeded in landing 156,000 troops within its first 24 hours. Indeed, by the end of the so-called ‘Longest Day’, Hitler’s much vaunted defensive wall had been breached... Read more...

The D-Day Beach Landings

Posted in World War II The D-Day Landings by Thomas Walker

It had been four years since British forces retreated from the beaches of Dunkirk. But by the summer of 1944 they were ready to go back. Not to Dunkirk, but to Normandy. And not alone, but with their American and Canadian allies... Read more...

The Battle of Britain: An Overview

Posted in World War II The Battle of Britain by Thomas Walker

Winston Churchill’s address to the House of Commons had made it abundantly clear to the British public that there would be no negotiation or agreement with Germany. Virtue would now have to triumph over evil. And it would have to do so alone... Read more...

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